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Discover the four benefits of our Olive Leaf Extract…
Olive Leaves have a long history of use as a herbal tonic to support cardiovascular function…
Olive leaves have been traditionally used to enhance functioning of the immune system…
Almost double the antioxidants of green tea extract, Olive Leaf Extract fights free radicals…
The science behind Olive Leaf Extract and its many health benefits…
The most widely promoted and scientifically proven healthy lifestyle in the world…
Research conveys our Olive Leaf Extract has 400% more antioxidant power than Vitamin C…
The balanced synergy of active compounds gives our extract its effective healing power…
Olive Leaf Australia is proud to be the world's largest specialised olive leaf grove…
Explore our Olive Leaf Grove and meet the team who bring you Olive Leaf Australia's extracts...
Some fast facts on the history of olive leaves and their unique health properties…

Blog

How to Survive Summer

13·01·16

Australia is known for being a land of extremes, particularly extreme heat. Finding ways to keep cool are vitally important so we can stay comfortable, as well as to avoid potentially dangerous conditions such as heat stroke, and enjoy the summer months.

For You

Summer is possibly the worst time for illness (no-one wants to feel sick in the heat!), so staying well year round and supporting the immune system is key. Taking Comvita Olive Leaf Extract every day, in either our one-a-day capsule or in a liquid dose, is a natural and effective way of looking after your wellbeing.

Drinking water frequently throughout the day helps to prevent dehydration and heat stress. Check the colour of your urine (pale yellow is good, dark yellow means you need to drink more) to ensure you are getting enough water throughout the day and be aware that your needs will vary depending on activity levels.

Avoid alcohol, coffee and caffeinated drinks as they can contribute to dehydration. Drink cool or iced drinks and if having juices or smoothies, add ice cubes to keep them colder for longer.

If you have to be outside on a hot day, make sure to follow the advice of Sid the Seagull, and Slip, Slop, Slap, Seek and Slide to protect yourself against heat stress and sunburn. Slip on a shirt, Slop on some sunscreen, Slap on a hat, Seek shade during the hottest part of the day and Slide on a pair of sunglasses.

A brilliant, but simple, way of staying cool if you are moving around is as easy as wetting a tea towel, spreading it out and lying ice along the length and then rolling it up and securing it with rubber bands on each end. This is fantastic for draping around your neck and wiping over your face.

Use ‘heat packs’ filled with wheat or barley as ‘cool packs’ by putting them in the freezer before use.

Wear light-weight, breathable clothing made from natural fibres that are light in colour to repel heat and allow your skin to breathe.

For Your Home

If you are able, open your windows during the night to let in the cool breezes. You can also set up fans so they encourage the cross-flow of air from one area of the house to the other.

Keep your curtains and blinds closed in the hottest part of the day, when the air outside is warmer than the air inside, especially for south and west-facing windows.

Turn on exhaust fans in the bathroom when showering and in the kitchen when cooking to pull hot air out of the room. If you have a BBQ, cook outside to reduce the amount of hot air circulating throughout your house.

Take a tepid bath or shower at night, and lightly spray your sheets with cold water before bed. This allows your surface temperature to cool down and help you to get a better night’s sleep in the heat.

Heat-related illnesses can be a very serious issue, so make sure to try different ways to stay cool and talk to your doctor if you aren’t feeling well in the heat. This is especially important if you, or someone you know, is elderly, has a heart condition or high blood pressure, is taking medications, is on a fluid-restricted diet or is frail and not able to access air conditioning. Infants, pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers are also at risk in higher temperatures, as are people who are taking medications for mental illness. Be aware and check on friends and family if you know they may be at risk, but don’t forget to enjoy some summery fun as well.

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